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Tuesday, Aug. 09, 2011

Around the Army

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Fort Riley aviation brigade trains with ground troops

Fort Riley’s aviation brigade hit the skies heavy this week to train with its 1st Infantry Division counterparts on the ground.

The Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, used its arsenal of Black Hawk and Chinook helicopters Aug. 3 to conduct air assault training with troops from the 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment.

Air assaults are the movement of ground troops to targets by use of helicopters. The events this week served to train both the helicopter crews and their passengers.

Chief Warrant Officer 2 Dwayne Williams piloted a Black Hawk on one of the missions. He has been with the brigade’s 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, for three years and knows what it takes to pull off an air assault in combat.

“I’d say 90 percent of it goes to the planning,” he said. “They tell us where they want to go, and it’s up to us to figure everything else out.”

Net Zero is Army sustainability goal

Soldiers are creative when it comes to figuring out ways to help the Army conserve its natural resources and create renewable energy.

Take the Soldier who switched hay for wood pellets to throw on the stable floors at the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment’s “The Old Guard” Caisson Stables at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Va.

What was once a waste product that had gone to the landfill is now turned into a usable product: compost for the installation.

“One thing that I admire about the Army is that we are full of extremely creative individuals,” said Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for installations, energy and environment.

She visited U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii to gain a better understanding of its sustainability and renewable energy strategies.

Net zero’s goal is to ensure that the Army consumes only as much energy or water as it produces and eliminates solid waste to landfills. By attaining net zero, the Army improves its sustainability and energy security challenges.

To read these stories, visit www.army.mil.

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