High school sports: Calvary Christian baseball signee a "pioneer" for program

dmitchell@ledger-enquirerJanuary 26, 2013 

When Calvary Christian catcher Hudson Clare signed a scholarship to play baseball at Bryan College on Friday, he became the first baseball player from the school to do so since 2007.

It was the first signee during coach Sean Burns’ time as head coach, and a sign of improving times for the program.

Clare said that he hopes he is a “pioneer” for the program, words echoed by Burns who said he thinks Clare is the first of many that will begin making the jump to college from his program in the near future.

Clare, who played his first season with Calvary Christian as a junior after moving in from Florida, hit .369 last season and hopes he can improve on that in 2013, specifically with his power numbers.

Burns said that in his offseason leagues, Clare has been hitting more doubles, something that will certainly aid the Knights in 2013.

“I’d love to have some guys that could hit more into the gap,” he said.

Throughout the recruiting process, Clare approached it like an individual searching for a job. He sent out emails to introduce himself to different colleges and kept in constant contact to show initiative and get a good look.

Bryan College, obviously, took notice.

Clare said that his ability to reach a college scholarship should serve as a lesson to those coming up in athletics at the school behind him.

“Just because I go to a small school doesn’t mean I can’t go play college athletics,” he said.

Follow David on Twitter @leprepsports

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