StoryCorps founder Dave Isay to speak at Columbus Public Library

From staff reportsFebruary 20, 2013 

Dave Isay, founder of StoryCorps, a regular feature on National Public Radio's "Morning Edition" news broadcast, will speak at 7 p.m. Feb. 28 in the Columbus Public Library auditorium to begin the second year of the Building Common Ground lecture series.

Admission is free, and no advanced tickets are needed. After his presentation, Isay will be available at a reception to sign copies of his books, which will be for sale at the event.

Co-presented by the Chattahoochee Valley Libraries and MidTown Inc., the lecture series highlights issues around which communities build identity, which in turn can guide development and growth. This year's series focuses on the arts and popular culture as a foundation for community involvement. Future speakers will include poet and activist Nikki Giovanni on April 18 and pop culture critic Chuck Klosterman on Oct. 3.

The series is funded in part by a grant from the Knight Fund at the Community Foundation of the Chattahoochee Valley Inc. Additional sponsors include the Muscogee County Friends of Libraries and media sponsor Sunny 100 Radio.

StoryCorps conducts the nation's largest ongoing oral history project, sending tens of thousands of recorded memories to the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Isay and StoryCorps have received numerous accolades for their work, including five Peabody awards, considered the most distinguished award in broadcast journalism.

The mission of StoryCorps is to remind one another of our shared humanity, strengthen and build the connections between people, teach the value of listening, and weave into the fabric of our culture the understanding that every life matters.

Isay, a MacArthur "Genius" and Guggenheim Fellowship winner, is the author or co-author of four books, including two StoryCorps books: "Listening Is an Act of Love" (2007) and "Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps" (2010). Both are New York Times bestsellers. He and his wife, Jennifer Gonnerman, live in Brooklyn.

Ledger-Enquirer is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service