rtrimarchi@ledger-enquirer.comJune 19, 2013 

ROBIN TRIMARCHI rtrimarchi@ledger-enquirer.com Command Sgt. Maj. Clyde A Glenn, left, of the 192nd Infantry Brigade, furls the brigade colors for casing with Maj. Gen. H. R. McMaster, Commanding General MCoE, center, and Col. Ronald P. Clark, Commander of the 192nd Infantry Brigade, during the 192nd Infantry Brigade Discontinuation Ceremony Wednesday at the National Infantry Museum parade ground. The basic combat training battalions are now under the command of the 194th Armored Brigade. 06.19.13

ROBIN TRIMARCHI

The colors of the 192nd Infantry Brigade were cased Wednesday during a Discontinuation Ceremony at the National Infantry Museum and Soldier Center.

The unit's discontinuance is part of the U.S. Army restructuring, and the need for fewer training units at Fort Benning. The number of soldiers who receive basic training here has dropped 23 percent since peak numbers in 2010.

Formed in 1921 in the Organized Army Reserves as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, the brigade was assigned to the 96th Infantry Division in Seattle. In 1944, the 96th ID deployed as part of the "Return to the Philippines Assault," and in 1945 the Division landed on Okinawa.

After 15 years of reorganization, the Brigade was deactivated from the 96th ID in 1962. In February 2007, it was reactivated at Fort Benning as an Army Basic Combat Training Brigade. The unit's three training battalions and the 30th Adjutant General Battalion (Reception) will now be under the command of the 194th Armored Brigade.

Col. Ronald Clark, who has commanded the Brigade since June 2011, will attend the Senior Service College Fellowship Program at Duke University, a postgraduate research fellowship for military officers.

Command Sgt. Maj. Clyde Glenn plans to retire in the Columbus area with his family. In 25 years of military service, Glenn has received many awards and decorations, including the Bronze Star Medal and the Order of Saint Maurice.

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