Georgia's math, reading scores grow for 2013; Alabama far below national average

acarlson@ledger-enquirer.comNovember 7, 2013 

Every two years, the U.S. Department of Education's National Assessment of Educational Progress releases an assessment of the reading and math scores of fourth and eighth grade students across the country, broken down by state.

The news is mixed for Georgia and Alabama.

The bad news for Georgia is that its scores are almost all below the national average. The good news is that they aren't below the average by much.

Indeed, the math scores for Georgia fourth-graders in 2013 was 240 (out of 500), which is just one point lower than the national average, and a two-point increase over 2011. Reading scores for Georgia fourth-graders in 2013 was 222, which is a point above the national average and an increase of one point over 2011.

The math score for Georgia eighth-graders in 2013 was 279, five points below the national average and a one-point increase over 2011. The reading score for Georgia eighth-graders in 2013 was 265, one point below the national average and a three-point increase over 2011.

These scores mean that Georgia was not significantly different from the national average in either reading or math for either grade.

As the AJC's Maureen Downey notes, "The NAEP scores run counter to the notion that Georgia’s public schools are abysmal and produce students who test near the bottom of national averages."

Alabama is a different story.

The math score for Alabama fourth-graders in 2013 was 233, which is eight points lower than the national average and a two-point increase over 2011. The reading score for Alabama fourth-graders in 2013 was 219, which is two points below the national average and a decrease of one point from 2011.

The math score for Alabama eighth-graders in 2013 was 269, fifteen points below the national average and the same score as 2011. The reading score for Alabama eighth-graders in 2013 was 257, nine points below the national average and a one-point decrease from 2011.

There are many other tools available at The Nation's Report Card. Check them out.

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