Parts of Alabama, Georgia are very unhealthy

acarlson@ledger-enquirer.comMarch 27, 2014 

Alabamians have high rates of obesity, child poverty and fair or poor health. Georgians are more likely to die before the age of 75; to take longer to graduate high school; and to have children with low birth weights.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation annual County Health Rankings has very little good news for either state. The report, a joint project with the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, uses "nearly three dozen indicators to pit regions against each other, all in an effort to measure ways to improve health outcomes across the country," according to the Washington Post, which further crunched and visualized that data into a series of maps about the nation's health. Counties in Alabama and Georgia got low marks in almost all of these.

Click here to see how Lee, Muscogee and Russell counties ranked.

Alabama:

• Chambers County: 39 percent of residents in fair or poor health. (Note: Almost 400 counties didn’t submit enough data to be ranked.)

• Dallas County: 60 percent of children (under the age of 18) living in poverty. That's 20 times the lowest rate in the country, Falls Church City, Va.

• Greene County: 48 percent adults are obese; 16 percent of live births weight less than 2,500 grams.

• Lowndes County: 44 percent of adults are obese.

Georgia:

• Clay County: 19,240 years of total life lost (the years before age 75 that residents pass away).

• Crawford County: Only 43 percent of ninth-graders graduate high school in four years.

• Paulding County: 64 percent of drivers are commuting more than 30 minutes each way to work. (Paulding is one of the westernmost counties in the metro Atlanta area.)

• Randolph County: 16.1 percent of live births weight less than 2,500 grams. • Talbot County: 16.3 percent of live births weight less than 2,500 grams.

• Terrell County: 17 percent of live births weight less than 2,500 grams.

• Union County: Only 37 percent of ninth-graders graduate high school in four years.

• Webster County: 17.1 percent of live births weight less than 2,500 grams.

Neither state made the list of counties with high rates of sexually transmitted diseases.

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