Students read the Creed of African/Black America during a check presentation at the Columbus Black History Museum and Archives. U.S. Rep. Sanford Bishop, second from left, presented Johnnie Warner, right, the museum founder and director, with a check for $5,000 from the Black History Observance committee. Back row from left: Dave Gillarm, grand historian for Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Georgia; Bishop; and committee chairman Teddy Reese, Esq. Front row from left: Skylar Lewis, 9, Amber Ray, 6, Kayle Lewis, 12, Andrew Lewis, 11, and Warner.
Students read the Creed of African/Black America during a check presentation at the Columbus Black History Museum and Archives. U.S. Rep. Sanford Bishop, second from left, presented Johnnie Warner, right, the museum founder and director, with a check for $5,000 from the Black History Observance committee. Back row from left: Dave Gillarm, grand historian for Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Georgia; Bishop; and committee chairman Teddy Reese, Esq. Front row from left: Skylar Lewis, 9, Amber Ray, 6, Kayle Lewis, 12, Andrew Lewis, 11, and Warner. ROBIN TRIMARCHI rtrimarchi@ledger-enquirer.com
Students read the Creed of African/Black America during a check presentation at the Columbus Black History Museum and Archives. U.S. Rep. Sanford Bishop, second from left, presented Johnnie Warner, right, the museum founder and director, with a check for $5,000 from the Black History Observance committee. Back row from left: Dave Gillarm, grand historian for Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Georgia; Bishop; and committee chairman Teddy Reese, Esq. Front row from left: Skylar Lewis, 9, Amber Ray, 6, Kayle Lewis, 12, Andrew Lewis, 11, and Warner. ROBIN TRIMARCHI rtrimarchi@ledger-enquirer.com

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