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  • Hovercraft Project brings STEM lesson to Columbus school

    Thanks to a serendipitous convergence of circumstances, Double Churches Elementary School students got an unusual hands-on lesson in the STEM subjects of science, technology, engineering and math — along with collaboration and communication — as they built hovercrafts and rode them across the gym floor Friday. “It really felt like we were flying,” said fifth-grader Luke Norsworthy, 10. “It was really cool.” His teacher, Eric Crouch, learned about the Hovercraft Project through one of his friends, Chaz Ingle. Ingle is a supplier of PVC material, which Matthew Chase uses in the Hovercraft Project, an initiative from Chase Educational Consulting, a nonprofit organization based in Sarasota, Fla.

Hovercraft Project brings STEM lesson to Columbus school

Thanks to a serendipitous convergence of circumstances, Double Churches Elementary School students got an unusual hands-on lesson in the STEM subjects of science, technology, engineering and math — along with collaboration and communication — as they built hovercrafts and rode them across the gym floor Friday. “It really felt like we were flying,” said fifth-grader Luke Norsworthy, 10. “It was really cool.” His teacher, Eric Crouch, learned about the Hovercraft Project through one of his friends, Chaz Ingle. Ingle is a supplier of PVC material, which Matthew Chase uses in the Hovercraft Project, an initiative from Chase Educational Consulting, a nonprofit organization based in Sarasota, Fla.
Mike Haskey The Ledger-Enquirer