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Bartending tips: Learn tricks of the trade

Bartending is often more complicated than opening a beer and receiving a tip. Need proof? Four local servers share some stories from behind the bar.

JOSHCUA CINNAMON, 30

Works at: Eighty-Five, 900 Front Ave., Suite 202

Favorite party song: “25 or 6 to 4” by Chicago

Biggest tip: $200 on a $20 bar tab

Worst type of customer: “The ones without patience.”

Cheers: Stuff in a Cup isn’t the most appealing name for a shot, but Cinnamon thinks you’ll enjoy it. Mix half an ounce of Captain Morgan and half an ounce of Malibu; top with Midori, sweet and sour mix and pineapple juice.

LISA BANCER, 31

Works at: Flip Flops, 1111 Broadway

Favorite party song: Reggae music

Bartending advice: “Be as nice as you can. Always smile.”

The ring thing: She has a simple strategy for fending off romantic advances while at work. “I’m married, so I show my ring,” she said.

Oddest request: Between the standard requests for beer and mixed drinks, people occasionally ask Bancer to make drinks that involve fire. Her response? “We’re not allowed.”

VICKI McGURK, 55

Works at: Pop-A-Top, 210 32nd Street

Favorite party song: "Pop a Top"

Family tradition: McGurk’s father was the original owner of Pop-A-Top, a neighborhood bar that has been around for more than 30 years.

Beer or wine coolers: Pop-A-Top doesn’t serve mixed drinks, but simplicity doesn’t always equal satisfaction. Guests sometimes say the beer is too hot or too cold,

Sounds tasty: Some bartenders serve gourmet tapas. McGurk serves Vienna sausages, also known as “steak in a can.”

TABATHA OVDENK, 27

Works at: Mix Ultra Lounge, 1107 Broadway, and Hooters

Favorite party song: “I Like It” by Enrique Iglesias

Most requested cocktails: Crown and Coke, Long Island Iced Tea, Sex on the Beach

Pet peeve: Customers who block her service area

Try this drink: Ovdenk’s signature cocktail has a name we can’t print. We can give you the ingredients, however. Mix Dragon Berry Bacardi, cranberry juice and Red Bull for a concoction that’s not too sweet, but not too sour.

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