Databases

Here’s a database of 2019 salaries for Columbus Consolidated Government employees

Here are the top 10 paid positions in Columbus Consolidated Government

The Ledger-Enquirer has created a searchable database of Columbus Consolidated Government employees and their salaries for 2019. Here are the top 10 paid positions.
Up Next
The Ledger-Enquirer has created a searchable database of Columbus Consolidated Government employees and their salaries for 2019. Here are the top 10 paid positions.

The Ledger-Enquirer has compiled a searchable database that lists the salaries for full-time employees of the Columbus Consolidated Government.

It includes the employees’ annual approved salary for their current position as of July 30, 2019. City government salaries are a public record and can be obtained through an open records request.

The average salary for a Columbus city employee is $42,353.66, while the average estimated household income in Muscogee County for 2017 was $62,460, according to figures from the United States Census Bureau.

Here are some of salaries of top positions in the city:

  • Mayor Skip Henderson is paid $81,284.58
  • City Manager Isaiah Hugley: $147,872.40
  • Police Chief Ricky Boren: $111, 967.07
  • Sheriff Donna Tompkins: $102,736.56
  • Fire and EMA Chief Jeffery Meyer: $107,719.01
  • City Attorney Clifton Fay: $118,405.44
  • Tax Commissioner Lula Huff is the highest paid woman on city payroll with a salary of $130,193.88.

It should be noted that some employees may be on unpaid leave and may not earn the full salary associated with their position.

The salaries are also not reflective of overtime or other compensation the employee might receive.

The city budget for fiscal year 2020, approved by council in June, includes a 1% raise for all full-time city employees hired on or before June 30, 2018 as well as a 1% cost of living increase for all employees.

Both of those raises will go into effect in January 2020.

Click here to load this Caspio Cloud Database
Cloud Database by Caspio

Related stories from Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

  Comments