Local

Attorney: Student can barely stand to look at leg after amputation

Attorney of boy whose leg was amputated says 'he has good days, he has bad days'

Attorney Renee Y. Tucker gives an update on the condition of Montravious Thomas, the 13-year-old boy whose leg was amputated after he was allegedly thrown to the floor at Edgewood Student Services Center.
Up Next
Attorney Renee Y. Tucker gives an update on the condition of Montravious Thomas, the 13-year-old boy whose leg was amputated after he was allegedly thrown to the floor at Edgewood Student Services Center.

Two weeks after 13-year-old Montravious Thomas’ leg was amputated, his attorney said he can barely stand to look at the stump.

“Montravious is doing as well as expected for a 13-year-old given the experience,” attorney Renee Tucker said. “He has good days. He has bad days. He has good minutes. He has bad minutes. He’s still adjusting.”

Tucker is representing Thomas, whose leg was amputated after he allegedly was slammed to the ground Sept. 12 by a behavioral specialist at the Edgewood Student Services Center. At the time, Thomas was enrolled in the AIM program, an alternative school for students who violate the Muscogee County School District’s conduct code and temporarily are assigned away from their home school.

The attorney said Thomas was active before the incident. He didn’t play any school sports, but he enjoyed football, basketball and swimming, the attorney added.

“He was the typical active kid,” Tucker said of Thomas, who has an older brother and sister.

Thomas continues to receive treatment at Egleston Children’s Hospital in Atlanta, where the Oct. 18 amputation was performed. He will remain there for about three weeks before undergoing occupational and physical rehabilitation and psychological therapy.

Tucker said Thomas should have received medical treatment immediately after behavioral specialist Bryant Mosley allegedly slammed him to the ground five times.

According to a police report, Mosley told Columbus Police Lt. Consuelo Askew that he “had to physically restrain” the student “due to behavioral issues.”

Askew, who was working part-time as a school resource officer during the incident, confirmed Friday the incident is being investigated. No charges have been filed, she said.

The attorney said Mosley placed the child on the school bus and sent him home without any school officials providing medical assistance or notifying the family. Valerie Fuller, director of communications for the MCSD, said the school made “multiple attempts” to contact the teen’s parent by phone after the incident.

She also said “witnesses indicate that the child was up and walking and not in distress following the administered restraint.”

Before the amputation, Tucker sent the Muscogee County School District an ante litem notice “that had a number of $5 million” with plans to sue behavioral specialist Bryant Mosley and the Mentoring and Behavioral Services where he is employed.

An ante litem notice is required when someone intends to file a lawsuit against a governmental agency.

After that amputation, she said that amount is expected to rise with the medical expenses alone possibly exceeding $1 million. She said it’s unclear how much they will seek in the lawsuit.

“You can figure that if the child is in the hospital for two months at Egleston, that bill is going to probably be in the high ($800,000) or $1 million plus,” said attorney Forest Johnson, who owns the law firm where Tucker is employed.

Staff writer Mark Rice contributed to this report.

Sarah Robinson: 706-571-8622, @sarahR_92

  Comments