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Historic Westville finally has an opening date in Columbus. Here’s more.

Looking Back: Watch as the first Westville building arrives in Columbus

Historic Westville moved in early 2018 its first building, the 1800s-era Wells House, from Lumpkin, Ga., in Stewart County to their new site in off South Lumpkin Road in Columbus.
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Historic Westville moved in early 2018 its first building, the 1800s-era Wells House, from Lumpkin, Ga., in Stewart County to their new site in off South Lumpkin Road in Columbus.

Historic Westville, the living-history village that depicts life in the 19th century South, will open next month.

The attraction announced on its Facebook page Wednesday that it will open at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 22.

“Historic Westville Columbus is finally opening and we want you to be one of the first to experience it!” the post says.

The move from its previous site in Lumpkin, Georgia, to South Lumpkin Road in Columbus was discussed for several years. Once the moving process began, the village’s opening was delayed for various reasons, including periods of persistently rainy weather and construction.

The village features buildings and other period pieces chronicling 1850s Georgia. Westville will be organized into four interpretive areas, and the museum’s intent is to tell the stories of all “southern peoples including European Americans, African Americans, Native Americans, and immigrants — how their lives were inextricably linked but their experiences diverse due to race, class, and gender,” according to Westville’s Facebook page.

Exhibits, live interpreters and food and crafts will allow visitors to learn about life in the 19th century southern United States. The village’s new site is close to the National Infantry Museum and Oxbow Meadows Environmental Learning Center.

Historic Westville is a living-history village and museum that depicts life in rural Georgia in the mid-1800s has moved from Lumpkin, Ga and is in the process of preparing to open. Here's a snippet of what they do.

Ledger-Enquirer archives were used in this report.

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