Local

Migrant children, Westville, State Farmers Market and other Columbus news you may have missed

Fort Benning Centennial Minute: Now 100, Fort Benning has become “world renowned host of leadership development”

This Fort Benning Centennial Minute, produced by Fort Benning TV, celebrates Fort Benning's 100 years of U.S. Army infantry training and leadership development at what began as Camp Benning in 1918 on land near Macon Rd. in Columbus, Georgia.
Up Next
This Fort Benning Centennial Minute, produced by Fort Benning TV, celebrates Fort Benning's 100 years of U.S. Army infantry training and leadership development at what began as Camp Benning in 1918 on land near Macon Rd. in Columbus, Georgia.

Missed the big stories last week? Don’t worry. We’ve got you covered.

Fort Benning may house migrant children

Fort Benning is one of three military installations where the federal government may house migrant children.

Officials with the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Health and Human Services toured Fort Benning Wednesday to determine if it would be suitable for the task. Federal officials did not say why Benning was being considered or what parts of the installation were being examined.

The children that could be housed at Fort Benning are ages 17 and under, who were apprehended by the Department of Homeland Security and unaccompanied by parents or legal guardians.

The children also have no lawful legal immigration status.

In addition to Fort Benning, Oklahoma’s Fort Sill and Montana’s Malmstrom Air Force Base are among the military bases that may house the children.

Columbus gets $500,000 EPA grant

Columbus Consolidated Government received a $500,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to clean up the contaminated State Farmers Market site on 10th Avenue.

There are 10 dilapidated buildings including a restaurant, offices, warehouses, covered loading areas and a vehicle maintenance building. There are also two underground storage tanks on the site.

The site is contaminated with inorganic materials, metals and petroleum compounds, according to the EPA. Other pollutants include asbestos and lead paint.

The city will provide $100,000 in funding of some sort per federal stipulations.

Historic Westville gives media a sneak peek

Historic Westville opened its doors to media last week for a preview before the attraction’s official opening.

The living history village is set to open June 22 after several years of stops and starts tied to its move from Lumpkin, Georgia, to south Columbus.

There is still a lot of work left to do to as 14 structures remain in Lumpkin, and the goal is to move those structures, said Terra Martinez, Chief of Operations at Westville.

Extensive termite damage has been mitigated, and several buildings will be wrapped to prevent water damage while funds are raised to bring those buildings to the new site.

“We’re starting a new capital campaign to amp up fundraising again,” Martinez told the L-E. “The good thing is all the major infrastructure work has been done — all the sewage the electric, grading has all been completed, so it won’t be nearly the cost of this initial phase.”

President Carter back teaching Sunday school

Former President Jimmy Carter taught Sunday school in his hometown of Plains on June 9 for the first time after breaking his hip last month

Carter, 94, told the class that “ (my wife) Rosalynn and I have had some bad luck lately with our physical health,” the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

Carter broke his hip while preparing to leave his home to go turkey hunting near Columbus. On the day that he was scheduled to leave the hospital after his surgery, he got a call that Rosalynn Carter had a stroke. It was later determined she actually suffered a transient ischemic attack (TIA), often called a mini-stroke, the AJC reports.

Carter gave a 45-minute lesson and talked about various topics including Jesus washing the feet of his disciples and a call he had with President Trump about China.

  Comments