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Columbus police: Allegedly violent threats land two in jail for separate incidents

Columbus police arrested two people Thursday on separate allegations of making terroristic threats, charging that in front of other witnesses they threatened to kill someone.

The first case involved the manager of a Cheddar's restaurant at Columbus Park Crossing, who told police that when he fired a waitress around 3 p.m., the 30-year-old woman told him she was going to get her gun and blow his brains out.

He identified the former server as Brandy Kuykendall of Rodgers Drive, Columbus, whom police said they charged with terroristic threats for what she said in front of two other witnesses at the 5555 Whittlesey Blvd. eatery.

Four hours later, police were summoned to 3010 Hamilton Road, where a 48-year-old resident of the Rose Hill-area apartments building told officers a neighbor threatened to "kill several parties" and to cut someone's head off, investigators said.

In that case officers arrested Jerry Rooks, 46, and charged him with terroristic threats, police said.

According to Georgia law, a person commits the crime of terroristic threats when "he or she threatens to commit any crime of violence, to release any hazardous substance ... or to burn or damage property with the purpose of terrorizing another or of causing the evacuation of a building, place of assembly, or facility of public transportation or otherwise causing serious public inconvenience or in reckless disregard of the risk of causing such terror or inconvenience. No person shall be convicted under this subsection on the uncorroborated testimony of the party to whom the threat is communicated."

The code section specifically cites these circumstances:

-- Using "a burning or flaming cross or other burning or flaming symbol or flambeau with the intent to terrorize another or another´s household."

-- Unlawfully shooting or throwing an object "at a conveyance which is being operated or which is occupied by passengers."

-- Releasing "any hazardous substance or any simulated hazardous substance under the guise of a hazardous substance for the purpose of terrorizing another or of causing the evacuation of a building, place of assembly, or facility of public transportation or otherwise causing serious public inconvenience or in reckless disregard of the risk of causing such terror or inconvenience."

Anyone convicted of the offense faces a fine up to $1,000 or imprisonment for one to five years, or both, the law says.

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