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Venomous, illegal snakes discovered next to baby’s crib during drug raid, cops say

This file photo of a cobra shows one of the types of venomous snakes found at a Georgia home.
This file photo of a cobra shows one of the types of venomous snakes found at a Georgia home. Sacramento Bee

When investigators recently raided a Georgia home, they were searching for drugs but found something else illegal, WSB reported.

Venomous snakes.

The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office said it discovered three snakes, a Monocled cobra and two Gaboon vipers, which are illegal to own in Georgia, according to the Athens Banner-Herald.

And the snakes were being held next to a baby’s crib, per 11alive.com.

According to the SC Department of Natural resources, there are 38 types of snakes in the state, only six of which are venomous. Of those six, there are only two that are considered abundant to common - the cottonmouth and copperhead. Here are ways

The TV station reported the discovery led to the Sept. 19 arrest of Gregory Alan Frederick, who faces multiple charges according to arrest warrants released on Monday.

According to WSB, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources was called to remove the snakes from the home, which is located about 70 miles from Atlanta.

Additionally, Sheriff Janis G. Mangum said the Department of Family and Children’s Services was notified about the situation, according to the Banner-Herald.

“At the time the snakes were found, there was a child in the house,” Janis said, according to the newspaper. “It was a very dangerous situation for everybody in that home, especially the child.”

Because there was a child in the home, the 28-year-old Frederick was charged with reckless conduct, 11alive.com reported.

In addition to the deadly snakes, box turtles were also found inside of the home, and they are also illegal to own, per the Banner-Herald. In all, Frederick was charged with nine counts of unlawful possession of reptiles.

The Gaboon viper is known for having the longest fangs of any snake in the world, two inches, according to Guinness World Records.

The monocled cobra’s venom “is one of the fastest acting snake venoms in the world ... (and) can cause death within an hour,” Reptiles Magazine reported.

“Just because you have them in a container, doesn’t mean they can’t get out,” Janis said, according to WSB, which reported “another man will be charged with illegally possessing the cobra” as part of the investigation.

Carolina Reptile Conservation and Rescue center shows how killing snakes can destroy the ecosystem.

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Noah Feit is a Real Time reporter with The State and McClatchy Carolinas Regional Team. The award-winning journalist has worked for multiple newspapers since starting his career in 1999.
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