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A half blood Thunder Moon will rise Tuesday. What is that and where can you see it?

Total lunar eclipse, blood moon visible around the world

The blood moon was visible at different times in Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The total eclipse lasted nearly two hours, with the entire event lasting closer to four hours.
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The blood moon was visible at different times in Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The total eclipse lasted nearly two hours, with the entire event lasting closer to four hours.

Sky watchers will be able to see a half blood Thunder Moon on Tuesday night.

“Half blood” is another term for partial eclipse, as a full lunar eclipse is known as a blood moon, according to ABC30.

The partial eclipse begins at 11:43 a.m. Pacific time and ends at 5:17 p.m., according to timeanddate.com. The partial eclipse will reach its peak at 2:30 p.m. Pacific time.

Here’s the bad news: While people in Australia, Africa, South America and parts of Europe and Asia will at least get some view of the partial lunar eclipse, people in North America won’t be able to see it at all, according to Time.

But don’t despair: even if the partial eclipse isn’t visible from your location, you can still watch it online: timeanddate.com will offer a livestream of the event.

And even without a view of the eclipse, Tuesday night will still be “a great night to set up a telescope” as Saturn and Jupiter will be visible just to the right of the full moon, according to AccuWeather.

During a total lunar eclipse, the moon and the sun are on opposite sides of the Earth, according to NASA. At that time, Earth blocks most of the sunlight that would usually hit the moon, so that much of the moon is in Earth’s shadow. A partial lunar eclipse happens when only part of the Earth’s shadow falls on the moon.

The sunlight that does manage to pass through Earth’s atmosphere and reach the moon makes the moon look red — because most of the blue light has been filtered out by Earth’s atmosphere, NASA said.

The next time most of North America will see a lunar eclipse will be July 4, 2020, according to AccuWeather.

The Thunder Moon is a name for the July full moon: other names include the Buck Moon and the Ripe Corn Moon, according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac. The thunder moniker came about “because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.”

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Gabby Ferreira is a breaking news and general assignment reporter at The Tribune in San Luis Obispo. A native of Houston, Texas, she was a reporter in Tucson, Arizona; Indianapolis, Indiana; and Palm Springs, California, before moving to San Luis Obispo County in 2016.
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