Georgia

Football player told SC cops the white stuff on his car was bird poop. They disagree

What to do when police pull you over

A Raleigh video about what motorists should expect when stopped says you should answer all questions from an officer. But the state's driver's license handbook points out you are not legally required to answer questions after identifying yourself.
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A Raleigh video about what motorists should expect when stopped says you should answer all questions from an officer. But the state's driver's license handbook points out you are not legally required to answer questions after identifying yourself.

A college football player told a South Carolina cop the white powder on his car was bird poop — but drug tests gave a different answer, officials say.

Yafari “Shai” Werts was stopped on a highway last week when a deputy noticed small particles on the hood of his Dodge Charger, according to an incident report from the Saluda County Sheriff’s Office.

Werts, a quarterback for the Georgia Southern Eagles, said it must have been bird poop that didn’t come off at a car wash, the report says.

“I promise you that’s bird doo-doo,” Werts said, according to audio obtained by the Savannah Morning-News. “I swear to God.”

But a deputy at the scene told him the substance “was still in powder form and made no sense as to how it was still there if he washed it off at a car wash a few days ago,” according to the report.

Deputies say it tested positive for cocaine.

And not once, but twice, according to authorities.

It seemed the “substance was thrown on the vehicle and had been attempted to be washed off by the windshield wipers,” Saluda County deputies say in the report.

Werts was arrested on a cocaine possession charge and suspended from the Georgia Southern football team, WJCL reports. He returned to the practice field after passing a drug test, the station says.

The college athlete is from Clinton, South Carolina, about 62 miles northwest of Columbia, a team website says.

The recent traffic stop happened after a deputy clocked Werts driving at 80 mph, Saluda County officials say.

Werts, the only person in the car, continued going “at the same speed” even after the deputy turned on police lights, according to officials. While he was being followed, Werts called 911 to report he felt unsafe in the area, deputies say.

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