Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor for Friday, November 16, 2018

President Donald Trump waves as he walks with first lady Melania Trump, after stepping off Marine One, on the South Lawn of the White House on Sunday in Washington. Trump was returning from a trip to Paris.
President Donald Trump waves as he walks with first lady Melania Trump, after stepping off Marine One, on the South Lawn of the White House on Sunday in Washington. Trump was returning from a trip to Paris. AP

Pitts mistaken, yet again

How the process works Just when I thought my blood pressure was under control, you run another column by Mr. Pitts that is so erroneous it begs — nay, it actually weeps — for clarification.

President Trump recently announced his intent to do away with birthright citizenship by executive order. Birthright citizenship grants a person citizenship merely by the circumstances of their birth. It comes from the “Citizenship” clause of the 14th amendment, to wit, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.”

The 14th Amendment, along with the 13th and 15th, form the troika of amendments designed to grant full citizenship and the benefits of due process and equal protection to all who had been kept in slavery. But the 14th did not grant citizenship to everyone; only to those born or naturalized here who were subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. It did not grant citizenship to the Indians. Likewise, per the legislative history, it did not include “persons born (here) who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of (diplomats)”. The only Supreme Court case on the matter held that children of “legal aliens” born here are citizens (in this case the parents were permanently residing and doing business in California).

The President issues an order, a Judge in the 9th Circuit stays it, the 9th‘s appellate Judges then uphold the stay, and off it goes to the Supreme Court where a couple of years from now we have a decision. And then we all live with it.

Mr. Pitts — seriously — this is exactly how America works, and should work. It is neither absurd or dictatorial or fascist. He takes a stand and the courts take it from there.

Michael Fox,

Midland

Thanks from Columbus Jewish community

On behalf of the Jewish community of Columbus, we express our thanks to all those who joined us on Friday, November 2, 2018, in sympathy and support after the murders of members of Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh. We are also grateful for the calls, notes, and flowers sent by our neighbors.

It is a response that shows us that the poison of anti-semitism is not welcome here, and that there is a shared faith that transcends our particular religious affiliations. We were comforted and, indeed, strengthened by the presence of Catholics, Baptists, Methodists, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Muslims and Buddhists – believers from many traditions and no tradition – who all believe in the power of neighbors to create a community of respect, acceptance and loving kindness. We fervently pray that Columbus will be and remain such a place for all who live here, regardless of who they are, where they come from, or how they worship. May we all, together, embrace the work of tikkun olam, repairing the world, and may the fruits of these labors bring the blessings of peace.

Beth L. Schwartz,

Rabbi, Temple Israel

Brian Glusman,

Rabbi, Shearith Israel Synagogue

Julian Ripple,

President, Temple Israel

Daniel Borkat,

President, Shearith Israel Synagogue

Gloria Cohen,

President, Jewish Federation of Columbus

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