Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor for Sunday, April 7, 2019

Actress Alyssa Milano, left, delivers a letter to Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp’s office detailing her opposition to HB 481 at the State Capitol in Atlanta on Tuesday. HB 481 would ban almost all abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected.
Actress Alyssa Milano, left, delivers a letter to Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp’s office detailing her opposition to HB 481 at the State Capitol in Atlanta on Tuesday. HB 481 would ban almost all abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected. AP

They got some nerve

I have one question for the Hollywood delegation that felt privileged enough to instruct the citizens and elected officials of its adopted state of Georgia on matters of morality. The open letter so many actors signed said that, though they “want to stay in Georgia,” they could not “in good conscience” continue to do so if our legislature passes HB 481, the heartbeat bill.



Here they attempt a seemingly noble thing, to put their conviction before their interest. But then they make an ignoble request; they ask us Georgians to put our interest before our convictions by preferring the business and prestige of Hollywood in our state to what we think is morally right. That is not how you treat a host, not at least in the South that I know.



My question to Alyssa Milano, etc., is this: How can you expect us to take seriously your moral opinion if you do not also take ours seriously?



Clifford Humphrey,

Warm Springs

A thought to ponder

The Muscogee County jail houses over 1,000 inmates. However,the majority of those inmates are black males — so is the DA’s office racist or do black males commit the majority of violent crimes in Columbus? Inquiring minds would like to know the truth. Let’s put our differences aside and solve this riddle.

Michael Weaver,

Carterville

It’s a riddle

There are a number of Prescription Drug Discount Cards available to any consumer without charge.. They show prices we can get our prescription drugs for at a discount to what pharmacies will charge us if we don’t show them one of the cards. My question is: Since we pay nothing for the cards, and pharmacies obviously do not benefit financially for us possessing such cards, why are such cards necessary to lower prices? Why don’t the pharmacies just have a one-price policy for every drug for every customer?

Hal Kirven,

Columbus

A friendly clarification

I would like to clarify the point of my letter of March 17. The Letter was not a defense of Fox, per se. Fox, along with its peers, has a great many problems. Mr. Ailes and Mr. O’Reilly were serial abusers (but see also, Mr. Rose and Mr. Lauer). Mr. Carlson, Mr. Hannity and Ms. Ingraham are all unabashed Trump supporters, along with Ms. Pirro and the “Fox and Friends” crew (but see also Mr. Chris “I just got a thrill up my leg” Matthews; Ms. Rachel “Hey, I just got Trump’s tax returns” Maddow, and anyone on CNN). And Fox may very well have spiked the Stormy Daniels issue, but we know President Kennedy’s dalliances were ignored by everyone, Newsweek spiked the Lewinski story, the photograph of Candidate Obama and Minster Farrakhan was buried deep and last week we learned that Reuters withheld the fact the Mr. O’Rourke was a member of a group of hackers who stole financial information.

Even The New Yorker is not above reproach. While Mr. Farrow was accurate about the sins of Mr. Weinstein and others, what he wrote about Justice Kavanaugh was completely without merit.

The Respondent notes that the relationship between Fox and the president cannot be denied. This is true. Neither can the approach most of the media takes towards the president.

This is what a free press gets us, and it’s great. But a call for the Fox studios to be razed and salt sown in the ashes is absurd. And that was my problem with the article — you may not like Fox, I may be fed up with the Economist. But long may they — and the L-E — stand.

Michael Fox,

Midland

  Comments