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Auburn plotting satellite camp strategy to fit regional recruiting approach

Auburn running backs coach Tim Horton discussed the program's strategy for running satellite camps this summer.
Auburn running backs coach Tim Horton discussed the program's strategy for running satellite camps this summer. Auburn Athletics

The NCAA’s Board of Directors decision to reverse a ban on satellite camps last week had immediate implications for SEC coaches.

Within hours, SEC commissioner Greg Sankey issued a statement announcing the conference’s own ban on satellite camp expires May 29 and teams would be allowed to participate in camps this summer.

Auburn running backs coach Tim Horton greeted the news with a shrug.

“No big deal,” Horton said from an alumni club event Monday night at Roma Mia’s in Rome, Georgia.

The Tigers announced its coaching staff will be part of the Minority Coaches Association of Georgia's Football Academy camp June 9-10 at Woodland-Henry High School in Stockbridge, but the rest of the team’s summer camp schedule hasn’t been finalized.

Auburn’s tentative strategy is to use satellite camps as a way to bolster their regional recruiting efforts.

“Obviously, our footprint will be in the Southeast,” Horton said. “I think you're looking at Florida and Georgia. We're going to do camps whether it's at Auburn or whether it's in Florida somewhere.”

Auburn has only recruited four players out of high school from outside the three states in the last two recruiting classes and 84 percent of the team’s overall recruits have come from Alabama, Georgia of Florida during coach Gus Malzahn’s tenure.

While University of Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh introduced a satellite camp tour to expand his school’s recruiting blueprint, don’t expect Auburn to follow suit.

“I think we want to stay in our regional footprint, not just for camps, but for recruiting,” Horton said. “When you talk Alabama, Georgia and Florida, that's where we're going to make our hay, and that'll always be where we make our hay. So I don't see a big need to go out west or up north or something like that.”

Horton went one step further explaining why he isn’t worried about Harbaugh or any other power five school running camps in SEC territory.

“I may get myself in trouble for this: For people that want to come to Alabama and have a camp, I think it's great, because they're helping the quality of football in the state of Alabama,” Horton said. “(But) no one is coming to this state and getting a player from Auburn or Alabama. That's not going to happen. So hey, I'm for, if they want to come to our state and have it, that's going to help the quality of high school football.”

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